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John's Beekeeping Notebook

Fiji's Land and People (page 2)

Children often help with gathering firewood and cooking.My village is Nayaulevu, Ra, located in the interior of Viti Levu island.  The people at Nayaulevu grow sugar cane and most of their food crops.

I was often amazed at the resourcefulness of the Fijian people.  In the photo at left, some dough is being baked into tasty buns by heating from above as well as below.  Coconut husks serve as fuel. 

 

Fishing is most often by spear, net or hand line.The seas surrounding Fiji are rich with life.  Fishing by spear, net and hook are skills that most Fijians have.

Mosese and his mother, Uma, (right) are about to prepare our evening meal.  Mosese and I speared these sea creatures at night.


No fish size limits or seasons here!The little talapia at left will make a tasty meal at Merevakauca, Ra.   The women typically do most of the net fishing. 

Sometimes groups of 20 or more women would wade into the sea with big nets to herd and capture the fish.   

Almost every part of a killed animal is used.Mariana Nabutu (right) cuts cattle intestine into bite-sized pieces using a sharp piece of bamboo.  She has metal knives, but finds the razor-sharp bamboo more effective.

Most homes have mats covering the floor.Making mats from Pandanus leaves (left) was a common skill among women. 

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John's Beekeeping Notebook  http://www.outdoorplace.org/beekeeping/   Content from John's Beekeeping Notebook may be used for any non-commercial purpose except internet duplication, providing the source is acknowledged.  Created by John Caldeira, Dallas, Texas, USA    john@outdoorplace.org